Advanced Studies in the History of Philosophy:
Seminar on Friedrich Nietzsche

(covering material from 1872-3 through 1887-88)

Phil 4200/Spring 2000/Dr. Tuedio/Wed. 6-9pm/C-208
tuedio@altair.csustan.edu (667-3286) (L-195f)

Primary Texts:

Philosophy and Truth
("The Philosopher," "On Truth and Lies in a
Nonmoral Sense," and "Philosophy in Hard Times")
Unfashionable Observations
(the essays on "...History for Life" and
"Schopenhauer as Educator")
Human, All Too Human
(extensive selections from parts 1, 5 and 9,
and a few selections from part 2)
The Gay Science
(extensive selections from Books I, III and V, and
a few selections from Books II and IV)
Beyond Good and Evil
(primarily parts 1, 2, 5, 7 and 9)
Genealogy of Morals
(extensive selections from parts I, II and III)
Twilight of the Idols
(from "The Problem of Socrates" through
"The 'Improvers' of Mankind")
The Anti-Christ
(aphorisms 1-15)
The Will to Power
(primarily from Bk 1 part I, Bk 2 part I.1 & part
II.1-3, and Bk 3 parts I & II)
Thus Spoke Zarathustra
(selections from parts I, II, III and IV)

Assigned Secondary Text:

Solomon & Higgins (eds.), Reading Nietzsche
(primarily Bergmann,
Nehamas, Schacht, and Soll)

Supplemental Contemporary Readings:

Smith / The Contingencies of Value
Honig / Political Theory and the Displacement of Politics
Nehamas / The Art of Living: Socratic Reflections from Plato to Foucault
Nehamas / Nietzsche: Life as Literature
Cox / Nietzsche: Naturalism and Interpretation
Havas / Nietzsche’s Genealogy: Nihilism and the Will to Knowledge

Main Course Themes:

1) Nietzsche's critique of Metaphysics as "foundational philosophy" (the meaning of, and basis for, his proclamation "God is dead", his critique of the concepts of substance and identity, belief in the unconditioned as cause of the conditioned, the "true" world, nihilism as a necessary consequence of the downfall of Christian morality and its metaphysical system of meaning and values).

2) Nietzsche's critique of Christian and Enlightenment socio-moral systems
(the leveling systems of belief, human equality, moral duty and the selfish value of selfless actions, the problem of morality, the critique of moral "facts," herd morality and the herd virtues as an attack on the individual, as an attack on nature, the critiqure of the distinction between doer and deed, the critique of responsibility and accountability as a basis for justifications of punishment, ressentiment as a declining form of life).

3) Nietzsche's application of the "life" principle as the "natural" measure of value
(including the value of culture in the service of youth, the life-instincts of the free spirit, the goal of working to elevate human development, the notion of morality as anti-nature, the concept of life-affirmation as a calling to individuality, support for the creative instincts, and the revaluation of values).

4) Nietzsche's analysis of the role and place of the virtues in the life of the individual
(the revaluation of values, the effort to liberate individuality from the clutches of social domination and moral "taming" practices, critique of the notion of the "will", valuing creativity and originality in the affirmation of "ascending" forms of life).

5) Nietzsche's analysis of "romantic pessimism" as a "declining" form of life
(including the goal of ascetic living, ressentiment as a form of life, his critique of belief in nihilism as the upshot of the death of God, and his critique of the notion of human purpose).

6) Nietzsche's analysis of "truth-games," "justice," "causality," and the scientific spirit
(with a focus on his reflections on conviction, inquiry, promising, judging, the question of the value of truth, the question of the origins of our focus on justice).

7) Nietzsche's analysis of dissimulation and misdirectional language-games as structural manifestations of will to power
(in support of institutional/social forms of power and metaphysical grammar).

Calendar of Readings:

W 2/23 "On Truth and Lies in a Nonmoral Sense" (sections 1 and 2)
"On the Utility and Liability of History for Life"

W 3/01 "Schopenhauer as Educator"
Ivan Soll, "Pessimism and the Tragic View of Life"

W 3/08 "…History for Life"
(pages 85-95, 106-110, 117-18, 123, 125-26,
128-29, 131, 134-5, 152-53, 156-57, and 158-67).
"Schopenhauer as Educator"
(pages 192-94, 197-98, 201-06, 209-10,
213-14, 215-33, 251, and 254-55).
Human, All Too Human:
Preface to Vol. I, Chapter 5 (aphorisms 224-57
and 278), and Preface to Vol. II (pp. 209-14).
Thus Spoke Zarathustra:
"Zarathustra’s Prologue" and "On the Three
Metamorphoses"

W 3/15 Human, All Too Human:
Chapter 1 (aphorisms 1-34), Chapter 2
(aphorisms 39, 42-43, 45, 51-54, 56-61, 65, 70, 81, 89, 91-107),
and Chapter 9 (aphorisms 483, 500, 517-18, 608, 618, 629-38).
Thus Spoke Zarathustra:
"Afterworldsmen" thru "Reading and Writing"
and "War and Warriors" thru "New Idol"

W 3/22 The Gay Science:
Preface to the 2nd Edition, Book I (aphorisms 1-21,
26, 28, 33, 37, 39-41, and 51-56), Book II (aphorisms 57-58, and
76), and Book III (aphorisms 108-117, 121, 124-27, 143, 154, 162,
179, 189, 205, 233, 244, 258, 264-75).
Thus Spoke Zarathustra:
"Thousand and One Goals" thru "Way of the
Creator" and "Bestowing Virtue"

W 3/29 The Gay Science:
Book IV (aphorisms 276, 283, 285, 288-92, 294-97,
300-05, 307-08, 319-21, 326, 328, 335, 337-38, 341-42) & Book V
(aphorisms 343-47, 349-57, 359-60, 370, 373-75, 377-78, 380-82).
Schacht, "…How to Naturalize Cheerfully"
Thus Spoke Zarathustra:
"Blissful Islands," "the Virtuous," "Tarantulas,"
"Self-Overcoming," and " Great Events"

W 4/05 Beyond Good and Evil:
Preface, Part One (aphorisms 1-2, 4, 12-23),
Part Two (aphorisms 24-25, 31-32, 34, 36, 40-44), Part Five (aphorisms
186-88, 190-92, 199, 201-03), Part Six (211-12), and Part Seven
(aphorisms 214, 219-21, 224-25, 227-28, and 230-31).
Thus Spoke Zarathustra:
"the Wanderer," "the Vision & the Riddle,"
and "the Virtue that Makes Small"

W 4/12 Beyond Good and Evil: Part Nine
(aphorisms 257-65, 268, 272-74,
284, 287, 289, and 295-96)
Twilight of the Idols:
"The Problem of Socrates" thru "The ‘Improvers’
of Mankind" (pp. 29-59)
Nehamas, "Who Are ‘The Philosophers of the Future’?"
Thus Spoke Zarathustra:
"the Three Evil Things," & "Spirit of Gravity"

W 4/19 Genealogy of Morals:
Preface & First Essay (sections 1-5, 9-14, 16-17)
Bergmann, "Nietzsche’s Critique of Morality"
Genealogy of Morals:
Third Essay (1, 11-13, 15-17 (thru p. 130), & 23-24)
Thus Spoke Zarathustra:
"Old & New Law-Tables" (2-3, 7-12, 16, and 23-28)

Spring Break (April 22-28)

W 5/03 Genealogy of Morals:
Second Essay (all)
Human, All Too Human
Vol. II: AOM (89-91) and WS (39-44, 52, 55)
Thus Spoke Zarathustra:
"Ugliest Man," "the Shadow, & "the Greeting"

W 5/10 The Anti-Christ:
Foreword, and aphorisms 1-15 (pp. 114-125)
The Will to Power:
Preface, and sections 1-15, 18-23, 28-30, 36, 46,
54-56, 135-41, 144, 157, 233-35, 246, 249-52, 253-94, 338-39, 361,
370, 387, 390, and 405)
Thus Spoke Zarathustra:
"Higher Man" (1-8, 11, 17-20) & "Science"

W 5/17 The Will to Power:
481-518, 549-52, 616-17, 618-39, 642-50, 666-68,
670-76, 689, 696, 933-34, 1048-50, and 1066-67)
Thus Spoke Zarathustra:
"Intoxicated Song" & "The Sign"

W 5/24 In-Class Final Exam

Writing Assignments:

*4-page paper (1000 words) on theme #3 or theme #4 due: March 27.

3) Nietzsche's application of the "life" principle as the "natural" measure of value (including the value of culture in the service of youth, the life-instincts of the free spirit, the goal of working to elevate human development, the notion of morality as anti-nature, the concept of life-affirmation, support for the creative instincts, and the notion of a revaluation of values).

4) Nietzsche's analysis of the role of the virtues in the life of the individual
(the revaluation of values, the effort to liberate individuality from the clutches of social domination and the "taming" practices, critique of the notion of will, value of creativity and originality as an affirmation of ascending forms of life).

*5-page paper (1200 words) on theme #2 or theme #6 due: April 17.

2) Nietzsche's critique of Christian and Enlightenment socio-moral systems (the leveling systems of belief; human equality; moral duty and the selfish value of selfless actions; the problem of morality; the critique of moral "facts," herd morality and herd virtues as an attack on the individual and an attack on nature; the critique of the distinction between doer and deed; the critique of responsibility and accountability as a basis for justifications of punishment; ressentiment as a declining form of life).

6) Nietzsche's analysis of "truth-games," "justice," "causality," and the scientific spirit
(his reflections on conviction, inquiry, promising, judging; the question of the value of truth; and the question of the origins of our focus on justice).

*In-class final exam on theme #1, #5 or #7 May 24th 6-9pm.

1) Nietzsche's critique of Metaphysics as "foundational philosophy" (the meaning of, and basis for, his proclamation "God is dead", his critique of the concepts of substance and identity, belief in the unconditioned as cause of the conditioned, the "true" world, nihilism as a necessary consequence of the downfall of Christian morality and its metaphysical system of meaning and values).

5) Nietzsche's analysis of "romantic pessimism" as a "declining" form of life
(including the goal of ascetic life, ressentiment as a form of life, his critique of belief in nihilism as the upshot of the death of God, and his critique of the notion of human purpose).

7) Nietzsche's analysis of dissimulation and misdirectional language-games as structural manifestations of "will to power"
(in support of institutional or social forms of power and metaphysical grammar).

*One additional 4-5 page paper (1000-1200 words) on one of the four
remaining themes you have yet to write on. Due: May 31.


*Three well-developed question papers (1 page each @ 250 words)
Due: March 15, April 12, and May 10.

Course Learning Objectives:

Content Mastery

You will be expected to demonstate critical mastery of four of the following themes:
1) Nietzsche's critique of Metaphysics as "foundational philosophy" 2) his critique of Christian and Enlightenment socio-moral systems 3) his application of the "life" principle as a measure of value 4) his analysis of the role of the virtues in the life of the individual 5) his analysis of "romantic pessimism" as a "declining" form of life 6) his analysis of "truth-games," "justice," "causality," and the scientific spirit and 7) his analysis of misdirectional language-games as structural manifestations of will to power.

Skill Development


This course will emphasize development and application of: 1)
expository and critical writing skills 2) logical thinking and analysis 3) complex relations between abstract ideas 4) the relation of philosophical insights to problematic situations encountered in the lifeworld, and 5) the ability to use secondary literature to improve your understanding and critical assessment of primary sources.